5 Best Places To Ride Electric Bikes In Los Angeles

Los Angeles traffic might be some of the worst in California, let alone the country, but luckily driving to and from everywhere isn’t our only option. People who ride electric bikes know this better than anyone and can often easily zip through city traffic in our ebikes.

But sometimes the stress of riding in traffic can get annoying. You usually find using a bike path or road is just much funner and less stressful. Only problem is knowing where they are. Well, that’s why we at Kasen put together this list of some of the best places to ride electric bikes in Los Angeles.

Marvin Braude

https://www.traillink.com/trail/marvin-braude-bike-trail/

Length: 21 miles

Trail end points: Will Rogers State Beach on Pacific Coast Hwy./SR 1 (Los Angeles) and Via Riviera and Paseo de la Playa (Torrance)

Trail surfaces: Asphalt, Concrete

Trail category: Greenway/Non-RT

The Marvin Braude Bike Trail also known as The Strand, is featured in hundreds of TV shows and movies.

Ballona Creek Bike Path

https://www.traillink.com/trail/ballona-creek-bike-path/\

Length: 7 miles

Trail end points: National Blvd. and Pacific Ocean

Trail surfaces: Asphalt, Concrete

Trail category: Greenway/Non-RT

The Ballona Creek Bike Path follows the channelized Ballona Creek for 7 miles, from Syd Kronenthal Park in east Culver City (National Boulevard) to the Pacific Ocean, where it connects with the Marvin Braude Bike Trail. Along the way the trail passes through residential neighborhoods and then opens up into the Ballona Wetlands, with vistas and wildlife viewing. The path can be accessed off of many of the major streets; there is a pedestrian bridge at Ocean Drive.

L.A. River

https://www.traillink.com/trail/los-angeles-river-trail/

Length: 23.9 miles

Trail end points: Riverside Dr. at Ventura Fwy./SR 134 (Los Angeles) and Shoreline Aquatic Park Bike Trail on Golden Shore (Long Beach)

Trail surfaces: Asphalt

Trail category: Greenway/Non-RT

The paved Los Angeles River Trail—also known as the Los Angeles River Bike Path, Los Angeles River Bikeway, Los Angeles River Greenway Trail and Lario Trail—is just as long as it’s list of names. At about 24 miles long, if you’re trying to do some nonstop riding, you’ve come to the right place. During your ride, will be the adjacent Los Angeles River and the I-5 highway, which makes this trip less scenic than the others in this list. Despite all this, the L.A. river trail is a nice trip for those really trying to get distance in their cycling.

Chandler Bikeway

https://www.traillink.com/trail/chandler-bikeway/

Length: 2.8 miles

Trail end points: N. Mariposa St. and W. Chandler Blvd. (Burbank) and Fair Ave. and W. Chandler Blvd. (North Hollywood)

Trail surfaces: Asphalt, Concrete

Trail category: Rail-Trail

A path placed nicely in a Burbank neighborhood; the Chandler Bikeway is a well-kept, little stretch for cycling. Cycling through this bikeway you’ll see vibrant homes of all kinds, different trees, and flowerbeds you’d expect from this cute suburban neighborhood.

Shoreline Pedestrian Bike Path

https://www.traillink.com/trail/shoreline-pedestrianbicycle-path/

Length: 4.1 miles

Trail end points: Long Beach Shoreline Marina and 54th Pl. and E. Ocean Blvd.

Trail surfaces: Concrete

Trail category: Greenway/Non-RT

The Shoreline Pedestrian/Bicycle Path is a scenic multipurpose trail that runs from the tip of the breakwater opposite Island Grissom at the Long Beach Shoreline Marina to Long Beach’s Belmont Shore neighborhood. A great path along the beach with separate lanes for runners and cyclists, this is one of the easiest paths out in the open and great for beginners.

Arroyo Seco Bike Path

https://www.traillink.com/trail/arroyo-seco-bike-path/

Length: 2.1 miles

Trail end points: Marmion Way south of Arroyo Verde St. (South Pasadena) and Montecito Heights Recreation Center on Mosher Ave. (Mt. Washington, Los Angeles)

Trail surfaces: Concrete

Trail category: Greenway/Non-RT

The Arroyo Seco Bike Path runs about 2 miles between South Pasadena and northeast Los Angeles, offering views of the LA skyline and the distant mountains. It begins south of Pasadena Avenue and travels southwest along its namesake stream for its entire route. This bike path is pretty short but if you’re looking for a smooth ride going this way, you got it.

conclusion

Los Angeles definitely isn’t a stranger to alternate forms of transportation with the number of bike paths and roads in the county. This list features only a few of the many trails in the city but there are much more to discover!